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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume I, song 42, page 42 - 'Logan Water'

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Volume I, song 042, page 42 - 'Logan Water'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'For ever, fortune, wilt thou prove,
An unrelenting foe to love,
And when we meet a mutual heart,
Come in between, and bid us part;
Bid us sigh on from day to day,
And wish and wish the soul away,
Till youth and genial years are flown,
And all the life of love is gone.'

The verses at the top of this page are sung to the tune carried on page 41.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2178
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
130 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume I, song 42, page 42 - 'Logan Water'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
Whilst this English song appeared in the first volume of the 'Museum', it would never have been included in any of the later volumes. Johnson's original intention had been to gather together a collecton of Scots, English and Irish songs. This led to the inclusion of a number of traditional English and Irish songs in volume I. It was only when Burns became involved in the 'Museum', after the first volume had gone to press, that selection was restricted to songs and melodies of Scottish origin.