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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume I, song 49, page 50 - 'My ain kind Deary-o'

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Volume I, song 049, page 50 - 'My ain kind Deary-o'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'Will ye gang o'er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly wi' me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike, and birken tree, we'll daff, and ne'er be weary-o;
They'll scug ill een frae you and me, mine ain kind deary o!'

'Leerigg' or 'Lea-rig' is an unploughed grass field. 'Scug' is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2186
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
130 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume I, song 49, page 50 - 'My ain kind Deary-o'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Robert Ferguson (poet)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
According to Burns the original words for this song were mostly written by Fergusson, 'in one of his merry humours'. The old words begin: 'I'll rowe thee o'er the lea-rig, / My ain kind dearie, O, / I'll rowe o'er the lea-rig, / My ain kind dearie, O'. Burns is referring to the Scots-born poet, Robert Fergusson (1750-74). According to Glen (1900), 'This melody is better known by the title of Robert Fergusson's song 'The Lea Rig'.'