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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume I, song 95, page 96 - 'Lochaber'

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Volume I, song 095, page 96 - 'Lochaber'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'Farewell to Lochaber, and farewell, my Jean,
where heartsome with thee I have mony days been;
For Lochaber no more, Lochaber no more,
we'll may be return to Lochaber no more.
These tears that I shed, they are all for my Dear,
And no for the dangers attending on Weir;
tho' bore on rough seas to a far bloody Shore,
may be to return to Lochaber no more.'
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2237
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
130 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume I, song 95, page 96 - 'Lochaber'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Allan Ramsay (possible lyricist)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
Robert Riddell of Glenriddell (1755-94) (song's commentator)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
The words to this Jacobite air are thought to have been written by Allan Ramsay (1686-1758). Although not an overt Jacobite, he is understood to have expressed Jacobite sympathies. Robert Riddell, on the other hand, left a note in his copy of the 'Museum' claiming the lyrics to be written by an unfortunate fugitive. The tune to 'Lochaber' has been linked with a few other folk melodies, although the relationship between them remains unclear. The tune 'Limerick's Lament', of Irish origin, is thought to have preceded this song, along with 'King James' March to Ireland', first recorded in 1710. Burns, however, disagreed with this supposition.