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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume II, song 179, page 187 - 'Musing on the roaring Ocean'

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Volume II, song 179, page 187 - 'Musing on the roaring Ocean'

Introduction:
Verse 1 (to the tune of 'Druimion dubh'):
'Musing on the roaring ocean,
Which divides my love and me
Wearying Heav'n in warm devotion,
For his weal where'er he be.'
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2344
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
130 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume II, song 179, page 187 - 'Musing on the roaring Ocean'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Mrs McLachlan (subject)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
Burns in his personal notes on the songs comments, 'I composed these verses out of compliment to a Mrs McLachlan, whose husband is an officer in the East Indies'. This must have been a great compliment to Mrs McLachlan and a testament to her friendship with Burns, or else she had a very inspiring story. The melody on the other hand is much older and of Highland origin. There is another very similar tune to this called 'Drimen Cuff', but it is not exactly the same. Apart from this small amount of information, very little else is known about this song.