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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume IV, song 327, page 337 - 'Lord Ronald my son'

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Volume IV, song 327, page 337 - 'Lord Ronald my son'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'O where hae ye been Lord Ronald, my son?
O where hae ye been, Lord Ronald my son?
I hae been wi' my sweetheart, mother, make my bed soon,
For I'm weary wi' the hunting and fain wad lie down.'
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2500
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
132 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume IV, song 327, page 337 - 'Lord Ronald my son'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
Robert Riddell of Glenriddell (1755-94) (Burns's friend)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
Burns was asked by his friend, Robert Riddell, to make notes on some of the songs he collected. These were written into the interleaving page of Riddell's copy of the 'Museum'. Some of the notes are very brief and even terse but this song may have touched Burns in some way as he left this longer comment: 'This air, a very favourite one in Ayrshire, is evidently the original of 'Lochaber'. In this manner, most of our finest more modern airs have had their origin. Some early minstrel, or musical shepherd, composed the simple artless original air, which being pickt up by the more learned modern musician took the improved form it bears'.