Show Navigation

The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume IV, song 352, page 364 - ' I hae a wife o' my ain'

Back

View Large Image

Volume IV, song 352, page 364 - ' I hae a wife o' my ain'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'I hae a wife o' my ain,
I'll partake wi' naebody
I'll tak Cuckold frae nane;
I'll gie Cuckold to naebody.'
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2525
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
132 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume IV, song 352, page 364 - ' I hae a wife o' my ain'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
Glen (1990) says it is likely that this was either a simple country-dance tune to which 'some silly words were added', or was just not a song with a long history. However, the song is included in James Oswald's book, 'The Caledonian Pocket Companion' (1740), under the slightly different title, 'I've got a wife of my ain'. As Glen points out, though, the colloquial nature of the song title(s) shows that the song is indisputably of Scottish origin.