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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume V, song 415, pages 427 and 428 - 'Had I the wyte she bad me'

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Volume V, song 415, pages 427 and 428 - 'Had I the wyte she bad me'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'Had I the wyte, had I the wyte,
Had I the wyte, she bade me
had I the wyte, had I the wyte
Had I the wyte she bad me
Had I the wyte, had I the wyte,
had I the wyte she bad me
she watch'd me by the hie-gate-side,
And up the loan she shaw'd me.
And when I wad na venture in,
A coward loon she ca'd me:
And when I wad na' venture in,
A coward loon she ca'd me:
And when I wad na' venture in,
A coward loon she ca'd me,
Had Kirk and State been in the gate,
I lighted when she bade me.'

'Wyte' is 'to blame', 'hie-gate-side' is the 'highway', 'shaw'd' is 'showed' and, finally, 'loon' is a boy or a lad.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2594
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
258 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume V, song 415, pages 427 and 428 - 'Had I the wyte she bad me'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
William Thomson (publisher and song collector)
Allan Ramsay (publisher and song collector)
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
According to John Glen, in 'Early Scottish Melodies' (1900), the accompanying melody is also known as 'Come Kiss wi' me, come clap wi' me' and 'Had I the wate she bade me'. It appeared in a number of major song collections prior to the 'Museum', including Allan Ramsay's 'Musick for the Scots Songs in the Tea-Table Miscellany' (c. 1725) and in the 1733 edition of William Thomson's 'Orpheus Caledonius'.