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The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume VI, song 558, page 577 - 'Hey my kitten my kitten'

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Volume VI, song 558, page 577 - 'Hey my kitten my kitten'

Introduction:
Verse 1:
'Hey! my kitten my kitten,
An' hey my kitten a dearie
sic a sweet pet as this
is neither far nor nearie.
Now we gae up up up
An' here we gang down down downy,
Here we gae backwards and forward
And here round round a roundy.'
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
13789
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
129 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume VI, song 558, page 577 - 'Hey my kitten my kitten'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
Jonathan Swift (lyricist)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
The lyrics to this song are now attributed to Jonathan Swift (1667-1775), the Dean of St Patrick's in Dublin. Although perhaps better known for his political works and satires like 'Gulliver's Travels', Swift produced a prolific amount of material in his lifetime. The song is sometimes published under the title, 'The Nurse's Song'. The tune used in the 'Museum' is called 'Whip her below the Couring' and was first found in Mrs Crocket's manuscript book of 1710. It also goes by the name of 'Yellow Stockings', however.